Lincoln High School Standard Works Cited Format This list provides examples of the most basic types of citations. Because there are so many types of sources and possible variations, please check the Lincoln High School Library home page at http://www.lincolnlionslibrary.org. for additional links and resources. Examples taken from the Purdue OWL at owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/1/ Non-Electronic Sources Article from a Reference Book (Encyclopedias, Dictionaries, etc.) Format: Last name, First name (if available). “Title of article.” Title of book. Year of publication. Example: Tobias, Richard. “Thurber, James.” Encyclopedia Americana. 1995. . Book Format: Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. Publisher, Publication Date. Example: Henley, Patricia. The Hummingbird House. MacMurray, 1999. Chapter/Work in an Anthology Format: Last name, First name. “Title of Essay.” Title of Collection, edited by Editor’s Name(s), Publisher, Year, Page range of entry. Example: Harris, Muriel. “Talk to Me: Engaging Reluctant Writers.” A Tutor’s Guide: Helping Writers One to One, edited by Ben Rafoth, Heinemann, 2000, pp. 24-34. Occupational File Folders Format: “Title of article.” Name of Publication. Brief #. Publisher, Publication date. Example: “Accountant”. Chronicle Guidance Publications. 63. Chronicle Guidance Publications, Inc., 2004. Personal (or Telephone) Interview Format: Last Name, First Name. Personal (or Telephone) Interview. Date of Interview. Example: Smith, Jane. Personal interview. 19 May 2014. Helpful Hints!  Double-space within and between all entries  A corporation or group can also be listed as an author  Alphabetize all entries by the Author’s last name or by the first word in the entry. Don’t Forget! If you cannot find some of the information required, cite what is available! Online Sources Include a URL or web address to help readers locate your sources. Because web addresses are not static (i.e., they change often) and because documents sometimes appear in multiple places on the web (e.g., on multiple databases), MLA encourages the use of citing containers such as Youtube, JSTOR, Spotify, or Netflix in order to easily access and verify sources. However, MLA only requires the www. address, so eliminate all https:// when citing URLs. Many scholarly journal articles found in databases include a DOI (digital object identifier. If a DOI is available, cite the DOI number instead of the URL. Online newspapers and magazines sometimes include a “permalink,” which is a shortened, stable version of a URL. Look for a “share” or “cite this” button to see if a source includes a permalink. If you can find a permalink, use that instead of a URL. Entire Website (Skip any unavailable information) Format: Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). Name of Site. Version number, Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available), URL, DOI or permalink. Date of access (if applicable). Example: Felluga, Dino. Guide to Literary and Critical Theory. Purdue U, 28 Nov. 2003, www.cla.purdue.edu/english/theory/. Accessed 10 May 2006. A Page on a Website (Skip any unavailable information) Format: Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). “Title of Page.” Name of Site. Date of resource creation (if available). Date of access. Example: Lundman, Susan. “How to Make Vegetarian Chili.” eHow, www.ehow.com/how_10727_make-vegetarian-chili.html. Accessed 6 July 2015. Online Database Format: Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Periodical, Date or Volume.Issue (Year) : pages. Title of Database. Document number or URL. Examples: Alonso, Alvaro, and Julio A. Camargo. “Toxicity of Nitrite to Three Species of Freshwater Invertebrates.” Environmental Toxicology, vol. 21, no. 1, 3 Feb. 2006, pp. 90-94. Wiley Online Library, doi: 10.1002/tox.20155. Email Format: Last name, First name. “Subject Line of email.” Received by Name of Recipient. Date. Example: Neyhart, David. “Re: Online Tutoring.” Received by Joe Barbato, 1 Dec. 2016. Blog, Discussion Group, or Listserv Posting Format: Editor, screen name, author, or compiler name (if available). “Posting Title.” Name of Site, Version number (if available), Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), URL. Date of access. Example: Salmar1515 [Sal Hernandez]. “Re: Best Strategy: Fenced Pastures vs. Max Number of Rooms?” BoardGameGeek, 29 Sept. 2008, boardgamegeek.com/thread/343929/best-strategy-fenced-pastures-vs-max-number-rooms. Accessed 5 Apr. 2009 YouTube Video Format: Last name, First Name. “Title of Video.” YouTube, uploaded by Username (only if different from author), Date, URL. Example: McGonigal, Jane. “Gaming and Productivity.” YouTube, uploaded by Big Think, 3 July 2012, www.youtube.com/watch? v=mkdzy9bWW3E. Don’t Forget! If you cannot find some of the information required, cite what is available! Helpful Hints!  Dates are written Day Month Year (9 Oct 2009)  Spell out May, June, July. The rest of the months can be abbreviated. Revised 6 Sept 2016